Folic Acid Side-Effects & Interactions

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When taken by mouth: Folic acid is LIKELY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth. Most adults do not experience any side effects when used in doses less than 1 mg daily.

Folic acid is POSSIBLY UNSAFE when taken by mouth in large doses, long-term. Although doses up to 5 mg daily have been safely used in some research, doses of folic acid greater than 1 mg daily might cause abdominal cramps, diarrhea, rash, sleep disorders, irritability, confusion, nausea, stomach upset, behavior changes, skin reactions, seizures, gas, excitability, and other side effects.

There is also some concern that taking too much folic acid for a long period of time might cause serious side effects. Some research suggests that taking folic acid in doses of 800 mcg to 1.2 mg daily might increase the risk of a heart attack in people who have heart problems. Other research suggests that taking these high doses might also increase the risk of cancer such as lung or prostate cancer.

When given as a shot: Folic acid is LIKELY SAFE for most people when injected into the body. Most adults do not experience any side effects when used in doses less than 1 mg daily.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Folic acid is LIKELY SAFE when taken by mouth appropriately during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Taking 300-400 mcg of folic acid daily is commonly used during pregnancy to prevent birth defects.

Procedures to widen narrowed arteries (angioplasty): Using folic acid, vitamin B6, and vitamin B12 intravenously (by IV) or by mouth might worsen narrowed arteries. Folic acid should not be used by people recovering from this procedure.

Cancer: Early research suggests that taking 800 mcg to 1 mg of folic acid daily might increase the risk of cancer. Until more is known, people with a history of cancer should avoid high doses of folic acid.

Heart disease: Early research suggests that taking folic acid plus vitamin B6 might increase the risk of a heart attack in people with a history of heart disease.

Malaria: Early research suggests that taking folic acid plus iron might increase the risk of death or need for treatment in a hospital in areas of the world where malaria is common.

Anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency: Taking folic acid might mask anemia caused by vitamin B12 deficiency and delay appropriate treatment.

Seizure disorder: Taking folic acid supplements might make seizures worse in people with seizure disorders, particularly in high doses.

Interactions

  • Fosphenytoin (Cerebyx) interacts with FOLIC ACID: Fosphenytoin (Cerebyx) is used for seizures. The body breaks down fosphenytoin (Cerebyx) to get rid of it. Folic acid can increase how quickly the body breaks down fosphenytoin (Cerebyx). Taking folic acid along with fosphenytoin (Cerebyx) might decrease the effectiveness of fosphenytoin (Cerebyx) for preventing seizures.
  • Methotrexate (MTX, Rheumatrex) interacts with FOLIC ACID: Methotrexate (MTX, Rheumatrex) works by decreasing the effects of folic acid in the body’s cells. Taking folic acid pills along with methotrexate might decrease the effectiveness of methotrexate (MTX, Rheumatrex).
  • Phenobarbital (Luminal) interacts with FOLIC ACID: Phenobarbital (Luminal) is used for seizures. Taking folic acid can decrease how well phenobarbital (Luminal) works for preventing seizures.
  • Phenytoin (Dilantin) interacts with FOLIC ACID: The body breaks down phenytoin (Dilantin) to get rid of it. Folic acid might increase how quickly the body breaks down phenytoin (Dilantin). Taking folic acid and taking phenytoin (Dilantin) might decrease the effectiveness of phenytoin (Dilantin) and increase the possibility of seizures.
  • Primidone (Mysoline) interacts with FOLIC ACID: Primidone (Mysoline) is used for seizures. Folic acid might cause a seizure in some people. Taking folic acid can along with primidone (Mysoline) decrease how well primidone works for preventing seizures.
  • Pyrimethamine (Daraprim) interacts with FOLIC ACID: Pyrimethamine (Daraprim) is used to treat parasite infections. Folic acid might decrease the effectiveness of pyrimethamine (Daraprim) for treating parasite infections.

Hope this article is Helpful 🙂 🙂

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